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Do you ever hide a part of yourself away when you head into the workplace? It’s something many of us do every day. I’ve been doing it for more than 20 years. Every weekday morning I get up, don a long-sleeve business shirt, and transform from the music-loving, football-watching obsessive I am after hours into the word-driven, client-focused Senior Content Writer I am for Hunt & Hawk. There’s a

“If you don’t like what is being said… change the conversation.” If only we could all be as charismatic as Don Draper. Played with magnetic intensity by the impossibly-chiselled Jon Hamm, the suave creative director and main marketing man of AMC's award-winning Mad Men always knew just what to say at exactly the right moment. I’ve been re-watching the show again lately – it last aired eight years ago

“You didn’t have much to say in that meeting?” Has a work colleague ever muttered this rhetorical question to you? If you take a ‘church mouse’ approach to meetings – office-based or online – such observations have the ability to dent your confidence and even self-worth. But selective speaking in group settings isn’t necessarily a negative trait. In fact, far from it. Here, we explore the question: is being quiet in

Whether you whisper it quietly or shout it from the rooftops, it’s pretty clear to anyone in the workplace that times have changed. What was once a traditional career path of obtaining a qualification and climbing the corporate ladder has now undergone a significant evolution. Long gone are the days when if you asked someone their work history, they’d tell you they started at an entry level